Tips for caring for someone living with dementia

Our Woking Day Care service provides dementia care and activities and gives carers much needed extra support. At the heart of the service is Woking Day Care Manager Francesca Simpson. For Dementia Action Week, we asked Fran to share helpful tips around caring for someone living with dementia.

Tip 1: Reminiscence tools

Tip 1: Reminiscence tools. A person living with dementia may want to walk out the front door or 'go home', even though they are at home. Speak to them about home. Ask them where their home is ? Who lives at that home? Is that the home you had your children at? This is a reminiscence tool that can help evoke happy emotions and discussion.

Tip 1: Reminiscence tools. A person living with dementia may want to walk out the front door or ‘go home’, even though they are at home. Speak to them about home. Ask them where their home is ? Who lives at that home? Is that the home you had your children at? This is a reminiscence tool that can help evoke happy emotions and discussion.

Tip 2: Navigating restless situations

Tip 2: Navigating restless situations. Tip 2: Navigating restless situations. Some people living with dementia may become 'restless'. Ask them if they would like to go for a walk or if something is upsetting them. Listen to what they have to say, provide empathy and clarity. For example: "Mrs Jones, I am sorry you have lost your door key, that's very upsetting. Shall we look for it together?" instead of "Mrs Jones, your son has your keys because you keep loosing them."

Tip 2: Navigating restless situations. Tip 2: Navigating restless situations. Some people living with dementia may become ‘restless’. Ask them if they would like to go for a walk or if something is upsetting them. Listen to what they have to say, provide empathy and clarity. For example: “Mrs Jones, I am sorry you have lost your door key, that’s very upsetting. Shall we look for it together?” instead of “Mrs Jones, your son has your keys because you keep loosing them.”

Tip 3: Enabling choices

Tip 3: Enabling choices. Sometimes a diagnosis of dementia can lead to everyday choices being taken away. To help enable choices: 1. Limit the choices available. "Yellow blouse or red blouse?". 2. Show the choice. Sometimes they may find it difficult to understand without a visual aid.

Tip 3: Enabling choices. Sometimes a diagnosis of dementia can lead to everyday choices being taken away. To help enable choices: 1. Limit the choices available. “Yellow blouse or red blouse?”. 2. Show the choice. Sometimes they may find it difficult to understand without a visual aid.

Tip 4: Issues with eating

Tip 4: Issues with eating. Dementia can effect how people see the world around them. If someone you care for has stopped eating, it could be due to difficulties with perception. Try using a red plate. This will add a strong backdrop to define their food, making it easier for them to select.

Tip 4: Issues with eating. Dementia can effect how people see the world around them. If someone you care for has stopped eating, it could be due to difficulties with perception. Try using a red plate. This will add a strong backdrop to define their food, making it easier for them to select.

We hope you’ve found these tips helpful. For more information about our Woking Day Care service, which specialises in dementia care, email enquiries@fote.org.uk or call 01483 753 652.